2016 Alliances & Partnerships

Sometimes, it isn’t the best thing to be the smartest person in the room.

Sometimes, it isn’t the best thing to be the smartest person in the room.

This is where consulting, business partnerships, and other sorts of teamwork come into play.

Even when you have the right idea for yourself, your consideration of the situation may be limited by what you know about yourself.. The personal limitations you know you have.

Adding one or more other people to the equation does way more than double your abilities now that there are two people involved.

The other person comes to the table with his or her life, personal, and business experience, none of which YOU HAVE! 😀

The other person comes to the table with equipment that they spent their money on that you didn’t.

I’ve seen the future… It’s creating alliances and partnerships in 2016. Continue reading “2016 Alliances & Partnerships”

Conflation and False Societies

There’s no such thing as “The Female Society”. There is no annual meeting where all women sit down and decide what all women are going to do as a collective.

Therefore, the concept of all women stopping giving it up at the same time doesn’t make any sense, though it makes for good theater. 😀

Conflation occurs when the identities of two or more individuals, concepts, or places, sharing some characteristics of one another, seem to be a single identity — the differences appear to become lost.

In other words, when you look at two people and assume they’re part of the same society but they actually aren’t, you make mistakes in dealing with those people.

Lysistrata

Spike Lee just did a movie based on the play Lysistrata, which is, literally and without exaggeration… THOUSANDS. OF. YEARS. OLD.

If you think it didn’t represent the modern day horror story that is the slums of Chicago, Illinois, USA, you’re absolutely right.

Here’s what the play was about:

Lysistrata (/laɪˈsɪstrətə/ or /ˌlɪsəˈstrɑːtə/; Attic Greek: Λυσιστράτη, “Army Disbander”) is a comedy by Aristophanes. Originally performed in classical Athens in 411 BC, it is a comic account of one woman’s extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War. Lysistrata persuades the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands and lovers as a means of forcing the men to negotiate peace—a strategy, however, that inflames the battle between the sexes. The play is notable for being an early exposé of sexual relations in a male-dominated society.

Sound familiar? 😀 Continue reading “Conflation and False Societies”