Stop. Letting. *IDIOTS*. Represent. You.

If you continue to let idiots, dregs of humanity, and lowlives speak for you, don’t complain when you get what you deserve because people believe you’re affiliated with them.

Here’s how the internet works… Some event occurs and 100 people post about the exact same thing, along with their two-cent-worth commentary about it.

Have you ever watched a football game IRL (in real life), with actual human beings that were in the same room you were in?

If not, skip to the next section. < *DING*>

If you have.. When a touchdown is scored, people simultaneously cheer or boo = react.

On the internet, when something occurs, people react to it after a) the event occurs, b) they find out about it, and c) they get a chance to upload their thought(s) to social media.

This means that you will have someone cheering for a touchdown that occurred on Sunday, but it will already be Tuesday.

Meanwhile, people cheered ALL OF SUNDAY and ALL OF MONDAY already. 😀

It’s only on rare occasions that any of these people are EXPERTS in what they’re talking about.

Most of the time, they’re just human beings with feelings and a smartphone.

What happens next is worse, though…

The comment section. Continue reading “Stop. Letting. *IDIOTS*. Represent. You.”

Spectator Society [Conflation, Part 03]

Don’t worry about what “We” are going to do when you aren’t a part of “We” in the first place.

Social Media is great. 🙂

An unfortunate effect of social media on a lot of people is that it causes them to develop a warped perception of themselves as participants in situations where they’re merely spectators.

This leads to questions they unnecessarily rack their brains over, such as “What are *WE* going to do about this? :O” when they have no say in the matter whatsoever.

Your ability to say something doesn’t indicate any power that you have to change anything at all about the situation you’re commenting on. Continue reading “Spectator Society [Conflation, Part 03]”

Chris Rock Hosts The Oscars 2016 | 88th Academy Awards [Conflation, Part 02]

“How come it’s only unemployed people that tell you to quit something, you know? No one with a job ever tells you to quit.”

As we discussed in “Conflation and False Societies”, Conflation occurs when the identities of two or more individuals, concepts, or places, sharing some characteristics of one another, seem to be a single identity. The differences appear to become lost.

Chris Rock almost spoke about this in the monologue he wrote for the 88th Academy Awards [Oscars] Show.

Here’s what he said:

“How come it’s only unemployed people that tell you to quit something, you know? No one with a job ever tells you to quit.” Continue reading “Chris Rock Hosts The Oscars 2016 | 88th Academy Awards [Conflation, Part 02]”

Conflation and False Societies

There’s no such thing as “The Female Society”. There is no annual meeting where all women sit down and decide what all women are going to do as a collective.

Therefore, the concept of all women stopping giving it up at the same time doesn’t make any sense, though it makes for good theater. 😀

Conflation occurs when the identities of two or more individuals, concepts, or places, sharing some characteristics of one another, seem to be a single identity — the differences appear to become lost.

In other words, when you look at two people and assume they’re part of the same society but they actually aren’t, you make mistakes in dealing with those people.

Lysistrata

Spike Lee just did a movie based on the play Lysistrata, which is, literally and without exaggeration… THOUSANDS. OF. YEARS. OLD.

If you think it didn’t represent the modern day horror story that is the slums of Chicago, Illinois, USA, you’re absolutely right.

Here’s what the play was about:

Lysistrata (/laɪˈsɪstrətə/ or /ˌlɪsəˈstrɑːtə/; Attic Greek: Λυσιστράτη, “Army Disbander”) is a comedy by Aristophanes. Originally performed in classical Athens in 411 BC, it is a comic account of one woman’s extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War. Lysistrata persuades the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands and lovers as a means of forcing the men to negotiate peace—a strategy, however, that inflames the battle between the sexes. The play is notable for being an early exposé of sexual relations in a male-dominated society.

Sound familiar? 😀 Continue reading “Conflation and False Societies”