Ultimate Frisbee In Central Park



Ultimate Frisbee In Central Park, originally uploaded by Rob Boudon.

Rob Boudon’s pic from Frisbee

Ultimate Frisbee In Central Park

Bre, Rudy, Mike, Bill & Casey

Ultimate Frisbee In Central Park, originally uploaded by Rob Boudon.

Rob Boudon‘s pic from Frisbee:
Bre Pettis, Rudy Jahchan, Mike Hudack, Bill Cammack & Casey McKinnon

The Lab – Production Log Pickup 04

I had used the time between when I “finalized” my final revision of my dialogue script (as final as it was going to be until I actually started saying the lines and feeling them out), and when I was emotionally prepared to “attack” my lines to finish the rest of the edit. Everything was done except for saying and then loading my lines, color correcting them, tightening up the edit to work on the timing I felt was proper, then noise-reducing the drive sounds out from under my lines, watching the whole piece for timing, compressing and uploading. Everything went smoothly, like it’s supposed to, 😀 and I had my video uploaded by the time I headed out on Saturday around 4pm to play Ultimate Frisbee in Central Park.

I was actually a day late with my release, but there was nothing ‘good’ I really could have done about that. I had so much to do last week, including switching concepts entirely when I found out that “Witches of Eastwick” didn’t have what I needed to make a show, that by the time I got my final dialogue revision written, it was Friday evening or Friday night, and I had ZERO incentive or energy or DESIRE to read my lines AT ALL. Being a morning person, I woke up with ‘attack’ energy, prepared the set, then did my 45 minutes on-screen. It actually went pretty quickly, because I knew my lines, and it was only the break points that were tripping me up. Some of the takes I ended up using were the second or third ones, and I *KNEW* that I had aced them when I finished saying them, but I did several more takes anyway, for ‘safety’. That’s why it still took 45 minutes. I was going over the same lines, just in case.

Having internalized the process, I see that there’s an order I need to use when I to this format of a show. The MAIN thing is the clips. Until I have the clips I’m going to use, thinking about dialogue or writing dialogue is worthless. I have to make sure I have clips that are short enough that they’re all done in ~ 1:30. I have to have a punch-out, or I have to write one when I get to the dialogue. Part of what made the process tedious was looking through the whole film for clips to use. I probably ended up using 1/5th of the footage that I thought was useful from “Clerks”. I ‘wasted’ a lot of energy thinking about bridging clips that I ended up not using at all. Next time I do a show in this format, I’m just going to be looking for the short stuff that illustrates the point and sets off my dialogue. It gets easier every time. All the rest of it is cookie-cutter formula at this point.

Having said that, I don’t actually WANT to do it.

continued…